• A BIM would replace this exiting process by responders utilizing it en route to the site.

  • Each vehicle would be equipped with some sort of computing device capable of operating a BIM.

  • The BIM would provide critical building information to the responders, which in turn would improve the efficiency of the response and, more importantly, minimize the safety risks.

  • The BIM coupled with the BMS would be able to clearly display where the emergency was located within the building, possible routes to the area, and any other harmful locations within the building.

  • Real-time updates to the model as the building design/layout changes over the years.

What the model can provide

  • Virtual building environment

  • Key access points

  • Hydrant locations

  • Hazardous materials presence

  • Type, Quantity, Location

  • Roof construction type

  • Sprinkler and FDC details

  • Alarm panel location

  • Stairwells

  • Utility shut-off valves

  • Occupant contact information

  • Building Management System (BMS) data in real-time

  • Opportunity for virtual response training